David Sirota
Manchester, New Hampshire

After my friend Amy taught me the basics of quilt making, I learned just about everything I know from watching Simply Quilts. I’ve spent the past 14 years looking for the quickest and easiest way to complete a quilt, short of just buying one! And as a result, I have developed the “No More Tears” method of paper piecing. I’ve taught this workshop throughout New England for several years now and it has changed the way my students paper piece ... forever! I can’t imagine going back to the old way.

Storm at Sea - "No More Tears" Paper Piecing Method, Full Day
Saturday, 8/16/2014 - 8/16/2014, 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Paper piecing will never be the same! Be on your way to creating a beautiful and versatile 30” x 30” Storm at Sea wall hanging using a revolutionary paper piecing technique. “No More Tears” takes much less time than traditional paper piecing and it enables you to use your paper pattern over and over again. Once you know the technique, you can use it on any paper piecing project. In this class you will learn the basics of paper piecing, the “No More Tears” method, Storm at Sea basics plus tips and tricks for precise construction. All levels. Materials List: 2 yds each of 2 highly contrasting fabrics cut to specifications. There will be enough left for backing and binding. Contrast is the key! Opposites on the color wheel work the best. If using a print you love, make the other more subtle so the patterns don’t compete with each other. Sewing machine and matching thread (matching to either fabric or grey works great, too). Fabric scissors, pins, rotary cutter, ruler and cutting mat (a small one is fine). Add-a-Quarter ruler (available for purchase in class, $10). Pre-class cutting instructions (will also be mailed to workshop registrants): Finished wall hanging should measure about 30” x 30”. All fabric is cut cross grain or folded selvage to selvage. Measurements allow for 40” of usable fabric. Bring cut pieces to class in 3 baggies - 1 for large center squares, 1 for sashing rectangles and 1 for cornerstone squares. Large center squares (9 total): From the dark fabric cut one 3-1/2” strip; from this strip cut nine 3-1/2” squares. Cut two 4-1/2” strips; from these strips cut eighteen 4-1/2” squares; cut these 18 squares diagonally in half to form 36 half square triangles. From the light fabric cut two 3-1/2” strips; from these strips cut eighteen 3-1/2” squares; cut these 18 squares diagonally in half to form 36 half square triangles. Sashing rectangles (24 total): From the dark fabric cut five 4” strips; cut these strips into twenty-four 4” x 7” rectangles. From the light fabric cut six 3” strips; cut these strips into forty-eight 3” x 5” rectangles; cut these 48 rectangles diagonally in half to form 96 “uneven” triangles. Note: since these triangles are “uneven” they have a definite direction in the block. It is important that you make sure that you pair your rectangles either wrong or right sides together before cutting then in half diagonally. An easy way to accomplish this is by making sure your strips are folded in half before cutting the rectangles. Cornerstone squares (16): From the dark fabric cut one 2” strip; cut this strip into sixteen 2” squares. Cut two 3” strips; cut these strips into thirty-two 3” squares; cut the 32 squares diagonally in half to form sixty-four half square triangles. (If you don’t have enough fabric, use the remainder of the 4” strip from the Sashing Rectangle to make up the difference.) From the light fabric cut two 2” strips; cut these strips into thirty-two 2” squares; cut the 32 squares diagonally in half to form 64 half square triangles. Sewing machine required.
NH 020   60.00

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*Quilts pictured above:
top row: "California Chardonnay" by Jan Rashid, "Gathering Baskets" by Margret Strauchman, "Life Goes On" by Irene MacWilliam
bottom row: "Technique Rebellion II Redux" by Melody Johnson, "Cape Primrose" by Barbra Barrick McKie, "Breadfruit in Blue Hawaii" by Connie Ayers